Small Business Demographic Evolution: The Backlash of Market Shifts

butterfly coming out of cocoonIf you’ve read this blog for even a month or two, you’ve noticed that I have a bit of a “soapbox issue” when it comes to your small business’ target audience.

Long story short, your audience is really friggin’ important, and if you’re not familiar with their unique personality, your marketing content and service offerings will fall down face first.

But what happens when, in an eye’s rapid blink, your target market evolves into something different? It’s happened for Mouse and Man on more than one occasion.

Even though our mission to help business owners become more visible on the Internet, our clients have evolved. In response, we adapted our deliverables with upgraded content based on the exact needs of our clients.

And therein lies the solution to the market shift dilemma: you have to customize nearly every service offering in your small business toolkit. And there’s nothing too troubling about that—in a nutshell, it’s basic customer service to develop customer-centric solutions.

The Problem with Demographic Changes

Unless you are an MTV executive reading this, you might not be familiar with the backlash that culminates in the wake of market shifts. If you are an MTV executive, your former audience demographic hates you a little bit.

The reason: MTV evolved (for lack of a better time) because the music industry itself shifted from Best Buy to iTunes. And with that massive shift in content delivery, the original audience became moot.

This video sums it up flawlessly.

(Seriously, watch that. ^)

When MTV de-evolved (that’s better!) from music television to crummy reality TV where the new demographic watches bumbling weirdoes make bad decisions, the original audience became slightly peed off.

And even though you don’t run too high of a risk for becoming the “next MTV,” there are a few considerations about demographic evolution to keep in mind.

The Target Audience Changes. The Mission? No So Much.

The times change. If this were 2006, you might be worried about how many MySpace friends you have. If this were 1998, you might be concerned that someone hit the wrong key on the computer, and that life as we know it would come to an immediate halt. (If you’re one of my younger readers, that’s a Y2K reference.)

But it’s 2014, and ISIS, Pope Francis, Ebola, and the smash Disney hit Frozen actually register with you. And those images meant nothing to you five years ago.

But even though the times change, and your audience changes with said times, that doesn’t dictate whether or not your mission itself changes. It’s about values, and if your business is focused on partnership with your clients, that means you run zero risk of alienating your audience.

Truth: the times can change all they want. Registration offices And when it inevitably happens, you’ll evolve into something even better. That’s not audience alienation; it’s small business intelligence.

Tell me about the needs of your market in the comments below!

Recommended Posts

Leave a Comment

five − three =

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt

Start typing and press Enter to search

two girls sitting by computer